Our board member, Dick Reigler recently partnered with The Nepal Foundation to assist with the Basa Project.

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Our board member, Dick Reigler recently partnered with The Nepal Foundation to assist with the Basa Project.

Dick Riegler a Board member of PGWI, a former Board member of the Nepal Foundation (NF) and current advisor, has been working with NF since early 2009 to establish WASH in a remote area of Nepal known as Basa. This newsletter includes discussion of the NF’s WASH accomplishments to date as well as additional work to be done in this vast, mountainous area with sparse population, little economic resources, and very little government support.The overall program addresses all community needs, not just WASH, and includes a strong community organization management and ownership component  without which  the many achievements would not be possible. Also, the WASH program has been a success (including the agricultural initiatives) because strong ties are in place with a highly qualified NGO based in Kathmandu, who provide technical, educational, and operational support. WASH initiatives are simply one component of the overall program which is improving the lives, health and prosperity of the people of Basa.  Please read more in the newsletter below.unnamed

 


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7th Annual Conference Proceedings Now Available!

Go to our “Conference” tab or see below!


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Saying No to Bottled Water

Earlier this year, San Francisco became the first major city in the U.S. that passed an ordinance to ban the sale and distribution of single-use bottled water in public spaces. Learn more from the Youtube video below! Could Philadelphia follow in their footsteps? 


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Fight for Safe Sanitation

On the evening of May 27, two teenage girls in the Uttar Pradesh state of India were raped and hanged when they were on their way to defecate in a field. The world is shocked and outraged. Nearly half of the country’s population – up to 68% in rural areas – lack access to basic sanitation and defecate in the open. Women and young girls especially are at risk of physical and sexual assault as modesty and tradition mean that they go to relieve themselves early in the morning or after dark.

This story is not unique to India. The chilling statistics and testimonies of physical and sexual violence due to a lack of a toilet press the urgency to scale up our fight for safe sanitation services, and to focus on the most vulnerable populations – women and children, the poor and elderly, the downtrodden.

No longer is sanitation merely the responsibility of national and regional governments but a responsibility for each and every one of us. We have moved far beyond the world where access to basic sanitation meant heavy infrastructure. There are numerous solutions – biodegradable single-use sanitation bags, toilet leasing systems, those that offer fertilizer and energy recovery – that do not require the traditional bells and whistles. We must come together to help take these innovative solutions from the lab to those that need it the most.

Women are assaulted and harassed around the globe on a daily basis. We can work to create more safe spaces. Nobody should feel threatened for answering the call of nature. As the global campaign continues to gain momentum, we ask you to support the Philadelphia’s Global Water Initiative’s activities in education, research, and project implementation.

Please share your thoughts below.